A jury of her peers essay

a jury of her peers essay

A jury of Her peers Essay

Indeed, in situations in which the prosecutor and defense counsel themselves recognize that the guilty plea is somewhat artificial, they will have jointly arrived at a written statement of guilt for the defendant to read that cleverly covers all the bases without providing much detail. The supreme court, for its part, has gone so far (with the Alford plea of 1970) as to allow a defendant to enter a guilty plea while factually maintaining his innocence. While, moreover, a defendants decision to plead guilty to a crime he did not commit may represent a rational, if cynical, cost-benefit analysis of his situation, in fact there is some evidence that the pressure of the situation may cause an innocent defendant to make. Research indicates that young, unintelligent, or risk-averse defendants will often provide false confessions just because they cannot take the heat of an interrogation. Although research into false guilty pleas is far less developed, it may be hypothesized that similar pressures, less immediate but more prolonged, may be in effect when a defendant is told, often by his own lawyer, that there is a strong case against him, that. How prevalent is the phenomenon of innocent people pleading guilty? The few criminologists who have thus far investigated the phenomenon estimate that the overall rate for convicted felons as a whole is between 2 percent and 8 percent.

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Presumably they did so because, even though they were innocent, they faced the likelihood of being convicted of capital offenses and sought to avoid the death penalty, even at the price of life imprisonment. But other publicized cases, arising with disturbing frequency, suggest that this self-protective psychology operates in noncapital cases as well, and recent studies suggest that this is a widespread problem. For example, the national Registry of Exonerations (a joint project of Michigan Law School and Northwestern Law School) records that of 1,428 legally acknowledged exonerations that have occurred since 1989 involving the full range of felony charges, 151 (or, again, about 10 percent) involved false. It is not difficult to perceive why this should. After all, the typical person accused of a crime combines a troubled past with limited resources: he thus recognizes that, even if he is innocent, his chances of mounting an effective defense at trial may be modest at best. If his lawyer can obtain a plea bargain that will reduce his likely time in prison, he may find it rational to take the plea. Every criminal defense lawyer (and I was both a federal prosecutor and a criminal defense lawyer before going on the bench) has had the experience of a client who first tells his lawyer he is innocent and then, when confronted with a preview of the. Usually, he is in fact guilty and was previously lying to his lawyer (despite the protections of the attorneyclient privilege, which many defendants, suspicious even of their court-appointed lawyers, do not appreciate). But sometimes the situation is reversed, and the client now lies to his lawyer by saying he is guilty when in fact he is not, because he has decided to take the fall. In theory, this charade should be exposed at the time the defendant enters his plea, since the judge is supposed to question the defendant about the facts underlying his confession of guilt. But in practice, most judges, happy for their own reasons to avoid a time-consuming trial, will barely question the defendant beyond the bare bones of his assertion of guilt, relying instead on the prosecutors statement (untested by any cross-examination) of what the underlying facts are.

As noted, numerous guarantees of this fair-minded approach are embodied in our Constitution, and were put there because of the founding Fathers experience with the rigged British system of colonial justice. Is not the plea bargain system we have now substituted for our constitutional ideal similarly rigged? Second, and closely related, the system of plea bargains dictated by prosecutors is the product of largely secret negotiations behind closed doors in the prosecutors office, and is subject to almost no review, either internally or by the courts. Such a secretive system inevitably invites arbitrary results. Indeed, there is a great irony in the fact that legislative measures that were designed to rectify the perceived evils of disparity and arbitrariness in sentencing have empowered prosecutors to preside over a plea-bargaining system that is so secretive and without rules that. Third, and possibly the gravest objection of all, the prosecutor-dictated plea bargain system, by creating such inordinate pressures to enter into plea bargains, appears to have led a significant number of defendants to plead guilty to crimes they never actually committed. For example, of the approximately three hundred people that the Innocence Project and its affiliated lawyers have proven were wrongfully convicted of crimes of rape or murder that they did not in fact commit, at least thirty, or about 10 percent, pleaded guilty to those.

a jury of her peers essay

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After all, crime rates have declined over the past twenty years to levels not seen since the early 1960s, and it is difficult to escape the conclusion that our criminal justice presentation system, by giving prosecutors the power to force criminals to accept significant jail terms. Most Americans feel a lot safer today than they did just a few decades ago, and that feeling has contributed substantially to their enjoyment of life. Why should we cavil at the empowering of prosecutors that has brought us this result? The answer may be found in Jeffersons perception that a criminal justice system that is secret and government-dictated ultimately invites abuse and even tyranny. Specifically, i would suggest that the current system of prosecutor-determined plea bargaining invites the following objections. First, it is one-sided. Our criminal justice system is premised on the notion that, before we deprive a person of his liberty, he will essay have his day in court,. E., he will be able to put the government to its proof and present his own facts and arguments, following which a jury of his peers will determine whether or not he is guilty of a crime and a neutral judge will, if.

An appeal to the prosecutors superior will rarely succeed, since the superiors feel the need to support their troops and since, once again, the prosecutor can shape the facts so as to make his superior find his proposed plea acceptable. And there is no way defense counsel can appeal to a neutral third party, the judge, since in all but a few jurisdictions, the judiciary is precluded from participating in plea bargain negotiations. In a word, she and her client are stuck. Though there are many variations on this theme, they all prove the same basic point: the prosecutor has all the power. The supreme courts suggestion that a plea bargain is a fair and voluntary contractual arrangement between two relatively equal parties is a total myth: it is much more like a contract of adhesion in which one party can effectively force its will on the other. As for the suggestion from some academics that this is the equivalent of a regulatory process, that too is a myth: for, quite aside from the imbalance of power, there are no written regulations controlling the prosecutors exercise of his charging power and no established. The result is that, of the.2 million Americans now in prison—an appalling number in its own right—well over two million are there as a result of plea bargains dictated by the governments prosecutors, who effectively dictate the sentences as well. A cynic might ask: Whats wrong with that?

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a jury of her peers essay

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Indeed, the resume law of every us jurisdiction leaves this to the prosecutors unfettered discretion; and both the prosecutor and the defense lawyer know that the grand jury, which typically will hear from one side only, is highly likely to approve any charge the prosecutor recommends. But what really puts the prosecutor in the drivers seat is the fact that he—because of mandatory minimums, sentencing guidelines (which, though no longer mandatory in the federal system, are still widely followed by most judges and simply his ability to shape whatever charges are. For example, the prosecutor can agree with the defense counsel in a federal narcotics case that, if there is a plea bargain, the defendant will only have to plead guilty to the personal sale of a few ounces of heroin, which carries no mandatory minimum. Put another way, it is the prosecutor, not the judge, who effectively exercises the sentencing power, albeit cloaked as a charging decision. Brittany murray/Long beach Press-Telegram/ap imagesBrian Banks and his lawyer from the Innocence Project at business the dismissal of his wrongful conviction on rape and kidnapping charges, long beach, california, may 2012.

Banks, who had been a high school football star with a scholarship to usc at the time of his arrest, served five years in prison for a crime he never committed after accepting a plea bargain under the advisement of his original lawyer. The defense lawyer understands this fully, and so she recognizes that the best outcome for her client is likely to be an early plea bargain, while the prosecutor is still willing to accept a plea to a relatively low-level offense. Indeed, in 2012, the average sentence for federal narcotics defendants who entered into any kind of plea bargain was five years and four months, while the average sentence for defendants who went to trial was sixteen years. Although under pressure to agree to the first plea bargain offered, prudent defense counsel will try to convince the prosecutor to give her some time to explore legal and factual defenses; but the prosecutor, often overworked and understaffed, may not agree. Defense counsel, moreover, is in no position to abruptly refuse the prosecutors proposal, since, under recent Supreme court decisions, she will face a claim of ineffective assistance of counsel if, without consulting her client, she summarily rejects a plea bargain simply as a negotiating ploy. Defense counsel also recognizes that, even if she thinks the plea bargain being offered is unfair compared to those offered by other, similarly situated prosecutors, she has little or no recourse.

Thus, whereas in 1980, 19 percent of all federal defendants went to trial, by 2000 the number had decreased to less than 6 percent and by 2010 to less than 3 percent, where it has remained ever since. The reason for this is that the guidelines, like the mandatory minimums, provide prosecutors with weapons to bludgeon defendants into effectively coerced plea bargains. In the majority of criminal cases, a defense lawyer only meets her client when or shortly after the client is arrested, so that, at the outset, she is at a considerable informational disadvantage to the prosecutor. If, as is very often the case (despite the constitutional prohibition of excessive bail bail is set so high that the client is detained, the defense lawyer has only modest opportunities, within the limited visiting hours and other arduous restrictions imposed by most jails,. The prosecutor, by contrast, will typically have a full police report, complete with witness interviews and other evidence, shortly followed by grand jury testimony, forensic test reports, and follow-up investigations.


While much of this may be one-sided and inaccurate—the national Academy of Sciences recently released report on the unreliability of eyewitness identification well illustrates the danger—it not only gives the prosecutor a huge advantage over the defense counsel but also makes the prosecutor confident, maybe. Against this background, the information-deprived defense lawyer, typically within a few days after the arrest, meets with the overconfident prosecutor, who makes clear that, unless the case can be promptly resolved by a plea bargain, he intends to charge the defendant with the most severe. Indeed, until late last year, federal prosecutors were under orders from a series of attorney generals to charge the defendant with the most serious charges that could be proved—unless, of course, the defendant was willing to enter into a plea bargain. If, however, the defendant wants to plead guilty, the prosecutor will offer him a considerably reduced charge—but only if the plea is agreed to promptly (thus saving the prosecutor valuable resources). Otherwise, he will charge the maximum, and, while he will not close the door to any later plea bargain, it will be to a higher-level offense than the one offered at the outset of the case. In this typical situation, the prosecutor has all the advantages. He knows a lot about the case (and, as noted, probably feels more confident about it than he should, since he has only heard from one side whereas the defense lawyer knows very little. Furthermore, the prosecutor controls the decision to charge the defendant with a crime.

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But if the use of a weapon is involved in the conspiracy, the defendant, even if she had a low-level role in the conspiracy, must be sentenced to a mandatory minimum of fifteen years imprisonment,. E., ten years on the drug count and five years on the weapons count. And if two with weapons are involved, the mandatory minimum rises to forty years,. E., ten years on the drug count, shredder five years on the first weapons count, and twenty-five years on the second weapons count—all of these sentences being mandatory, with the judge having no power to reduce them. In addition to mandatory minimums, congress in 1984 introduced—with bipartisan support—a regime of mandatory sentencing guidelines designed to avoid irrational sentencing disparities. Since these guidelines were not as draconian as the mandatory minimum sentences, and since they left judges with some limited discretion, it was not perceived at first how, perhaps even more than mandatory minimums, such a guidelines regime (which was enacted in many states. One thing that did become quickly apparent, however, was that these guidelines, along with mandatory minimums, were causing the virtual extinction of jury trials in federal criminal cases.

a jury of her peers essay

All this changed in the 1970s and 1980s, and once again it was in reaction to rising crime rates. While the 1950s were a period of relatively low crime rates in the us, rates began to rise substantially in the 1960s, and by 1980 or so, serious crime in the us, much of it drug-related, was occurring at a frequency not seen for many. As a result, state and federal legislatures hugely increased the penalties for criminal violations. In New York, for example, the so-called Rockefeller Laws, enacted in 1973, dictated a mandatory minimum sentence of fifteen years imprisonment for selling just two ounces (or possessing four advertisement ounces) of heroin, cocaine, or marijuana. In addition, in response to what was perceived as a tendency of too many judges to impose too lenient sentences, the new, enhanced sentences were frequently made mandatory and, in those thirty-seven states where judges were elected, many soft judges were defeated and tough. At the federal level, congress imposed mandatory minimum sentences for narcotics offenses, gun offenses, child pornography offenses, and much else besides. Sometimes, moreover, these mandatory sentences were required to be imposed consecutively. For example, federal law prescribes a mandatory minimum of ten years imprisonment, and a maximum of life imprisonment, for participating in a conspiracy that distributes five kilograms or more of cocaine.

change, chiefly because, as a result of the disruptions and dislocations that followed the war, as well as greatly increased immigration, crime rates rose considerably, and a way had to be found to dispose of cases without imposing. Plea bargains offered a way out: by pleading guilty to lesser charges in return for dismissal of the more serious charges, defendants could reduce their prison time, while the prosecution could resolve the case without burdening the system with more trials. The practice of plea bargaining never really took hold in most other countries, where it was viewed as a kind of devils pact that allowed guilty defendants to avoid the full force of the law. But in the United States it became commonplace. And while the supreme court initially expressed reservations about the system of plea bargaining, eventually the court came to approve of it, as an exercise in contractual negotiation between independent agents (the prosecutor and the defense counsel) that was helpful in making the system work. Similarly, academics, though somewhat bothered by the reduced role of judges, came to approve of plea bargaining as a system somewhat akin to a regulatory regime. Thus, plea bargains came to account, in the years immediately following World War ii, for the resolution of over 80 percent of all criminal cases. But even then, perhaps, there were enough cases still going to trial, and enough power remaining with defense counsel and with judges, to keep the system honest. By this I mean that a genuinely innocent defendant could still choose to go to trial without fearing that she might thereby subject herself to an extremely long prison term effectively dictated by the prosecutor.

In actuality, our father's criminal justice system is almost exclusively a system of plea bargaining, negotiated behind closed doors and with no judicial oversight. The outcome is very largely determined by the prosecutor alone. In 2013, while 8 percent of all federal criminal charges were dismissed (either because of a mistake in fact or law or because the defendant had decided to cooperate more than 97 percent of the remainder were resolved through plea bargains, and fewer than. The plea bargains largely determined the sentences imposed. While corresponding statistics for the fifty states combined are not available, it is a rare state where plea bargains do not similarly account for the resolution of at least 95 percent of the felony cases that are not dismissed; and again, the plea bargains usually. Furthermore, in both the state and federal systems, the power to determine the terms of the plea bargain is, as a practical matter, lodged largely in the prosecutor, with the defense counsel having little say and the judge even less. It was not always. Until roughly the end of the civil War, plea bargains were exceedingly rare. A criminal defendant would either go to trial or confess and plead guilty.

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Honoré daumier: a criminal Case, the criminal justice system in the United States today bears little relationship to what the founding Fathers contemplated, what the movies and television portray, or what the average American believes. To the founding Fathers, the critical element in the system was the jury trial, which served not only as a truth-seeking mechanism and a means of achieving fairness, but also as a shield against tyranny. As Thomas Jefferson famously said, i consider trial by jury as the only anchor ever yet imagined by man, by which a government can be held to the principles of its constitution. The sixth Amendment guarantees that in all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury. The constitution further guarantees that at the trial, the accused will have the assistance of counsel, who can confront and cross-examine his accusers and present evidence on the accuseds behalf. He may be convicted only if an impartial jury of his peers paper is unanimously of the view that he is guilty beyond a reasonable doubt and so states, publicly, in its verdict. The drama inherent in these guarantees is regularly portrayed in movies and television programs as an open battle played out in public before a judge and jury. But this is all a mirage.


A jury of her peers essay
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  1. A rebellious tomboy, scout has a fierce disposition toward any who challenge her, but at heart she believes in the goodness of people. Jury : The diary of a menendez juror hazel Thornton. Free shipping on qualifying offers. Hazel Thornton takes us behind the scenes of one of the highest profile murder cases of all time. August 4, 1992 was a warm, sunny day in Bridgewater, connecticut, but in our familys country home, frog Hollow, there was a chill in the air.

  2. Autor: review november 23, 2010. Essay 356 Words (2 Pages) 926 views. Historically, jury, size mattered The right to trial by jury resides deep in the American psyche. It ranks right up there with Mom, apple pie, and the first Amendment. Scout (Jean louise finch) The narrator and main character who begins her story at almost six years old.

  3. The entire section has 536 words. Click below to download the full study guide for. A jury of Her peers. A jury trial, or trial by jury, is a lawful proceeding in which a jury makes a decision or findings of is distinguished from a bench trial in which a judge or panel of judges makes all decisions. Dare Essay, this, essay dare Essay and other 64,000 term papers, college essay examples and free essays are available now.

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